Face-to-face with Ningaloo’s living miracles

Face-to-face with Ningaloo’s living miracles

Oct 13, 2018

“Places like Exmouth Gulf are vanishingly precious. They help keep our natural estate and our world heritage assets alive. They challenge and feed our scientific knowledge. And they help keep ordinary citizens sane. So, this development is an awful prospect, a disaster in the making.” See Tim Winton’s story in The Guardian and The Observer.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/oct/14/im-face-to-face-with-ningaloos-living-miracles-and-it-feels-holy

MORE LATEST NEWS & EVENTS

Senior Communication Adviser Job Opportunity

Our campaign is ramping up to an exciting new phase and we’re seeking a senior communications professional to rapidly build PN’s public profile. If you have exceptional digital and media skills, have senior experience, are passionate about conservation and want to help defend Ningaloo and Exmouth Gulf, this is a significant opportunity to do meaningful work and make a difference.

Sylvia Earle marks Ningaloo’s Nursery as a global Hope Spot

Sylvia Earle has been called ‘explorer-in-residence’ for National Geographic, a Living Legend by
the Library of Congress, ‘Her Deepness’ by The New Yorker and Hero for the Planet by Time. This week she has named Western Australia’s Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf as an international “Hope Spot” in a move that will boost its international profile and lend firepower to the campaign to save Ningaloo’s nursery from industrialisation.

Exmouth Gulf makes it to The New York Times

Blanche D’Anastasi from James Cook University has found that Exmouth Gulf is a global hotspot for sea snakes. A great story about a passionate young scientist making a difference and bringing the world’s attention to brand-new research.

Scientists say Exmouth Gulf needs protection from industry

The ABC reports that sixteen scientists from the UWA’s Oceans Institute, James Cook University, Curtin University, Sharks and Rays Australia and Oceanwise Australia have contributed to a landmark report that uncovers Exmouth Gulf’s extraordinary biodiversity. It finds the Gulf is a globally important refuge for humpback whales, dugongs, rare dolphins and many endangered species. Endorsed by the IUCN, it recommends a major research effort and protection from industrial pressure.

Exmouth Gulf has more fish species than Ningaloo

Western Australia’s Exmouth Gulf has more species of fish than the adjacent and World Heritage-listed Ningaloo Reef, according to a review of the area’s environmental values. It’s a globally unique ecosystem. Read more…

If you love Ningaloo
it’s time to step up
and defend it.